Follow this tribute and get updates
User avatar
Lisa Ashurst
10 years ago

I know I'm almost a year late but I was Bernadette's friend and whenever I visited, her dad would always sing "Mona Lisa" (my name being Lisa) and then add "Bernadette's got a picture of you on the wall!" (Mona Lisa print). He was such a nice, warm hearted man, always chatty and making jokes and his family must be missing him very much. Regards...Lisa Ashurst (Stewart)

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

Four a.m., Saturday 31 July 2010, and the alarm radio broke the icy air in the bedroom... time to get up and take off for Gerringong. Had a shower and dressed and gave Spud a gentle nudge to tell her it’s time to arise... (she is not a morning person). I woke her and rushed off to make a couple of hot teas... we were both dressed for the occasion.... 5am, hit the foggy road filled with fuel and began the four-hour plus trip to G’gong.... Around 7am stopped at Macca's, Yass, for an unhealthy breakfast and continued the trip. Arrived in G’Gong around 10am and alighted from the car in the main street for a well-earned wee stop and then a cup of coffee before the service. We sculled our coffee and headed off up the hill to the church. Arrived at the church, St Mary Star of the Sea.. a lovely little church with beautiful grounds overlooking the ocean... The reason this church was chosen was that it was Eddie’s favourite church. He would attend on a Sunday while living down the coast. He used to go to different churches along the coast. Got out of the car and walked towards the crowd gathered outside but could not recognise anyone... got a few funny stares from - some were kinda "we may know you" stares ... and then Rosemary was on the scene and she recognised me at once. She introduced me to Paul, Dorothy, Monica, Rosemary and Damian. Deirdre, whose face was the only familiar one, entered my little crowd, which left one to go, and then I saw a flaming redhead, who turned out to be Bernadette. So now I had said hello etc to all my cousins whom I never really knew, except for Deirdre and Bernadette, as I joined the Navy at 17 and did not know all the others - or if i did know them they were all little rugrats of no interest to me at the time... It was good catching up with them, and Rosemary (junior) who now lives in QLD will be in touch with you Anne... I think the order of children are Deirdre, Bernadette, Monica, Paul, Rosemary, Damian and Dorothy. We proceeded into the church for the service. At the head of the coffin was a stand with some of Eddy’s favourite toys on display, like a mouth organ and a photo and an Irish saying on a little bookmark with some wise words on it - it finished with “and even though we’re miles apart remember what I said, get to heaven half an hour before the devil knows you’re dead”- and some odds and ends which only the family would know of. Deirdre started her eulogy with “Ed, Eddie, Edward was a man of few words” - which brought a wave of laughter from those present... and she cupped her hand and looked down at the coffin and said, "I think he's trying to say a few words... It was well done and gave me more info on an uncle whom I admired a lot but did not know that well, after all. A lull in the service and the haunting tune of Danny Boy played on the organ caused my eyes to well, with the emotions and memories of our Uncle Eddie. At the conclusion of the service and as the coffin was taken outside the Galilee Song was played, which I found apt for the man and moving, and it goes like this: Galilee Song Deep within my heart, I feel voices whispering to me Words that I can’t understand, meanings I can’t clearly hear Calling me to follow close, lest I leave myself behind Calling me to walking into evening shadows one more time. So I leave my boats behind Leave them on familiar shores Set my heart upon the deep Follow you again, my Lord. In my memories, I know how you send familiar rains Falling gently on my days, dancing patterns on my pain And I need to learn once more in the fortress of my mind To believe in falling rain as I travel deserts dry. So I leave my boats behind Leave them on familiar shores Set my heart upon the deep Follow you again, my Lord. As I gaze into the night down the future of my years I’m not sure I want to walk past horizons that I know But I feel my spirit called like a stirring deep within Restless, ’til I live again beyond the fears that close me in. So I leave my boats behind Leave them on familiar shores Set my heart upon the deep Follow you again, my Lord. Once outside, and after exchanging more hugs and kisses, we drove to the cemetery, which was on a hill overlooking the grounds at the back of the church. At the conclusion of the graveside service the family gathered around the open grave and Damian pulled out Eddie’s mouth organ and proceeded to play a tune that was very familiar to the Blayney clan and Rosemary. I can remember Eddie playing a mouth organ, along with him pulling his eye out at Blayney parties etc. So they laid Eddy to rest with an ocean view, and Rosemary mentioned to me that she would have to come back occasionally to trim and prune the trees that might block his view of the coast. After the cemetery it was off to the Fishermans Club in Gerroa for a feed and a few drinks etc. Liz and I had a couple of drinks and said our goodbyes, with promises to remain in touch... only problem is I did not get any contact details from the cousins. I have Rosemary’s phone number so that is a start. Rosemary lives in Bundanoon and we said how we would love to go there for the Scottish Highland fling held every April. She was delighted and offered her abode for us to stay in. We will have to work towards that outing in 2011. And so at around 1pm we hit the road for home, and after having a light lunch at Bundanoon we arrived home around 7pm, delighted that we made the effort that has given us fond memories of the day Edward Myles Blayney was put to rest.

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

I remember being about 3-5 years old and seeing Dad as an absolute super hero!! He was great!! After having children of my own, I realised the untold patience that Dad had with us in those days. I'm grateful that about 3 years ago, I had the opportunity to tell him that when I was calling him from overseas. I spoke of those days long ago and I said "You were a good dad." His reaction was just a quick "Yeah, thanks for that son" and then he moved quickly on to something else. I know he appreciated it, just the same. I'm certain he has now found the peace of mind that he never really had. Whether his ways agreed with us or not, Eddie will be sadly missed by many.

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

My memory of uncle Eddy was that he appeared to be the quite one compared to his brothers Frank, Kevin and John and on the surface was more refined than his brothers and some of his sisters... A good memory of uncle Eddy was in Orange at a party in the Kellys house. There was singing and drinking and they were all most probably "Inked". Uncle Eddy needed to go out to the little outhouse to relieve himself and before he went out he popped out his glass eye and dropped it into his glass of beer.. I was later told by uncle Eddy that this was his insurance that his brothers or anyone would not pinch his beer and drink the contents whilst relieving ones self.. His brother Kevin must have thought this to be a good idea as he used to drop his false front teeth into his glass..My memories are many and it was always exciting whenever our paths have crossed and I think the last time we were together was at his sister Sheila's 80th birthday in Liverpool. Edward Myles Blayney you will be sadly missed by all who had the pleasure of knowing you..

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

Im remembering his funny eccentric ways.He would make things or fashion bits of old objects together with something useful in mind.It didnt always get finished.I found in his possessions the glass from his binoculars (they would be a collectors item now if left intact!) and he had soldered it onto a metal piece of something with a bit of plastic wrapped around it to make a grip.Some kind of magnifying glass I suppose-or a monocular device...who knows! And we all found it greatly amusing how he had a kit in his boot for whenever he came to stay before he became too old in body for such adventures.The kit consisted of an air mattress,vacuum cleaner used to inflate it and a couple of pieces of masonite which he had connected with a hinge which slipped perfectly underneath the the top of the mattress and one piece folded upright in order to prevent his pillow from slipping.A portable bed head I suppose.Very innovative. The funniest I thought was his "remote control" It was only last year when I was visiting that I was introduced to the long long stick he had made with a soft piece of something on the end which he could use to change channels and adjust volume from the comfort of his recliner chair.He had given up in exasparation when the electronic remote had failed to work. I filmed him using this simple but ingenious device as I was so taken with it ! I also love how he would wear his sun visa in the lounge room some nights whilst watching tv as the glare from the overlight was too bright! Im not sure why he didnt think to switch it off.So many memories that are bringing a smile to my face. I miss you dad x

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

Watching the abc news sitting at your feet and you telling me about the Vietnam war. You said it had been going on for twenty years-a time frame I could scarcely comprehend. And you said it was a "just war". And then i remember being so proud when20 or so years later we watched the news again as the Iraq/Kuwait conflict was being threatened and you wanted to come to the protest march with me. You had realized war was the waste and fruitless exercise that it is. And I remember thinking how great it was that even you could change your point of view.

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

Laughter in the house as you showed us your glass eye tricks!

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

My earliest memory is of Uncle Eddie playing jokes on us with his glass eye - as a young child - the most amazing sight! The wonderful father, husband and such a great man of true values and honesty are my visions of this tall dark and handsome man .... time passes by so quickly - I would have loved to held your hand and told you how much you meant to me - but especially just how much you meant to my mother, your sister Margaret - you were so close - and it could not be denied you were so treasured in her heart and a true confidant throughout her short ( 51 years ) life. I am fortunate and privileged to know you and to share in many parts of our lives as our paths crossed. Rest in the peace you so rightly deserve. I am glad your exit was beautiful and peacefilled. your loving neice Annie ( Frauenfelder)

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

My earliest memories of darling Uncle Eddie were of him playing tricks on us - with his glass eye. He was the most treasured brother to my mother Margaret and I knew they were close - they were always laughing. My memories of holidaying in Lidcombe with my cousins are special - a special man - just like my dad - hardworking and very deeply religious - attentive dad and I always felt special to him as his visiting niece. my mum, his sister had 9 of us and he had 7 of his own with beautiful Rosemary - so gentle and soft - I always felt safe and warm at that Lidcombe house - except when we had to do the afternoon chores - I remember vegetable gardens? and Rabbits! My Uncle Eddie taught me the value of being truthful, honest, loving and accepting. A tall dark and handsome man, a good man. One to be proud of knowing and loving. Rest in Peace dear loving Edward, you deserved a peaceful exit from this life and I am pleased you received it. I feel for John now - your last remaining brother of the 10 brothers and sisters born to your mother. your children will cope now you have departed, your teachings for them now complete. I love you with all my heart, your loving neice, Anne Therese Walters ( Frauenfelder)

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

My dear Uncle Eddie , my mother's beloved and cherished brother. Naturally , my first memories of you were visiting us ( your sister's family) in Orange NSW where we lived after mum (your sister, Margaret) and her handsome husband Tony ( my dad) moved after getting married in Sydney. They had 2 boys there in Sydney then after moving to cold Orange - had 7 more kids! Mum and you shared so much together - as she had 9 kids and you had 7! My earliest memory is of you playing tricks on us with your glass eye! I thought you were indeed magic. Well ... you were really - to me - your humble niece. Tall, dark and so handsome! On holiday in Lidcombe you always proved to be the attentive father and hardworking husband as I found my own father to be. always kind to me - always truthful, always religious with a sense of good doing. I just loved you Uncle Eddie and I am sure you left this world in a peaceful exit, as you deserved it - I hope you are laughing now with my beloved mummy Margaret. all my love forever, Anne Therese Walters - ( Frauenfelder)

User avatar
Anonymous
11 years ago

Discussing something political in the news and agreeing about it. Swooning over the spectacle of 'Turandot' at the Opera House. Comparing notes on the phone after getting up at 4am miles apart to watch Placido Domingo do 'Tosca' in real time in Rome...